Annual of Urdu Studies, v. 2, 1982 p. 147.


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News & Events

1. "Intizar Hussain, the noted Urdu short story writer, novelist and columnist, has declined the Adamji Literary Award for his novel 'Basti'. In a letter addressed to the Secretary-General of Pakistan Writers' Guild, Intizar Hussain said: 'Thank you for the charity. I do not find myself deserving enough for the distinction. I may please be spared this honour. . . . That will earn you requital (Sawab) and provide me relief.'

"Another writer, Mushfiq Khwaja, from Karachi, too, declined the Dawood Adabi Award for his book 'Makhtootat-i-Urdu'. He said the Pakistan Writers' Guild usually gave awards to influential people and because of this a number of deserving books were ignored in the past. 'Therefore I cannot accept this award. The Guild, instead of announcing individual awards, should do something for the collective welfare of the writers in the country,' he added." From viewpoint (Lahore), Nov. 26, 1981.

2. *'. , . the Sind Government banned the holding of 'Mushai-ras' and other music and dance programs in educational institutions. This action was reported to have been taken after the Government had received reports that at some colleges drunken poets attended 'Mushairas' and this, the Government feared, might affect the moral development of the students, especially the girls." From viewpoint (Lahore), Sept. 24, 1981.

3. "Washington: An exceptionally successful effort for the cultural projection of Pakistan, through some 45 'Mushaira' sittings in 30 days across the length and breadth of North America, concluded last week with 'Jeevey, Jeevey Pakistan'.

"Leading the rendering of the popular song was its author, Jamiluddin Aali, and joining the chorus were Ambassador Ejaz Azim and his diplomatic colleagues, Pakistani officials from the World Bank, doctors, teachers and businessmen, and their wives, representing a cross-section of overseas Pakistanis.

"The venue was the Ambassador's residence. According to ex-envoy Sultan Mohammad Khan, it was the first time in 35 years that the place had been used for such a purpose.

"The visiting poets were Qateel Shifai, Himayat Ali Shair, Zamir Jafri, Syeda Parveen Fana, and Jamiluddin Aali. . . .

"Forty-five 'Mushaira' sessions in 30 days could be very tiring, said the poets, but the hospitality of overseas Pakistanis was so heartwarming that it refreshed them. Their great pleasure was that thousands of Pakistanis joined them in singing the popular song 'Jeevey, Jeevey Pakistan' at the conclusion of every 'Mushaira' sitting." From Dawn, Overseas weekly, Sept. 25, 1981.

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