Mahfil. v 7, V. 7 ( 1971) p. 149.


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THE HERMIT AND THE HARLOT

The Sanskrit farce Bhagavad-ajjuklyas attributed to Baudhayana translated by J. 4. B. van Buitenen

(After the Benediction enter the Director.)

Director; May Siva's foot protect thee I Palmists think highly of it — The sapphires on the diadems Of eminent godlings rub it — And its big toe has once been bent By the dastardly Ravana — May Siva's foot protect thee I

Here is my house, I am going insideo {entering) Clown, where are you?

Clown: Here I am, sir! Director: As long as there is nobody, I'll tell you something nice.

Clown: All right, sire (Goes outside ^ re-enters.) Nobody in the house, sir. Do tell me something nice, sir!

Director: Now hear thiSc Today I met this Brahman; he had come from out of town, an astrologer whose accuracy has sprung from untold successful predictions, and he made a prediction:

"Sir," he said, "a week from today you111 have a show at the royal palace. The king is going to be greatly pleased by your performance and he'll give you a fortune." Now that prediction, which is sure to come true, has given me a lot of energy, so I'm going to put on a playo

Clowns What kind of a play are you going to put on?

Director: That is a good question. There are about ten different emotions that you can convey in any kind of play, and as far as I can see, good humor is the best. So I'll put on a farce.

Clown: Sir? I never find humor even in a farce.

Director: Then I must train you. The untrained mind finds nothing«

Clowns Sir, then you must train me!

Director: By all means.

If you have set your mind on wisdom Follow the one who trods the good path —



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