Social Scientist. v 5, no. 51 (Oct 1976) p. 77.


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BOOK REVIEW

TERESA HAYTER, AID AS IMPERIALISM, Pelican 1971, pp 222, 0.35.

THIS IS a book of two tales both of which are, however, very real. Teresa Haytcr provides a fascinating account of how the major ^international aid agencies", the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the US Agency for International Development (AID) operate in Latin America. She unfolds an equally fascinating story of how the World Bank, which initially sponsored the study, desperately tried to prevent its publication. This is given in an appendix to the book, and should be recommended reading for those naive enough to believe that bourgeois institutions protect freedom of expression.

The book which grew out of a study intended, among other things, ^(as) an examination of the potential role of international institutions and of economic aid as catalysts in development", concentrates on ^activities which involve a fairly close collaboration between the international agencies and Latin American countries." '

The body of the book (excluding the appendix) is divided into four chapters. The introductory chapter on the concept of ^aid" is followed by a general discussion of the policies, rationale and methods of the World Bank, IMF, USAID and two Latin American aid agencies. The third chapter narrates the applications of these policies to four Latin American countries: Colombia, Chile, Brazil and Peru. The fourth chapter * draws some conclusions based on the study and the author's broad perspective.

Hayter begins by pointing out that CCAid has never been an unconditional transfer of resources."8 It is well known that foreign aid, whether directly from the governments of the advanced capitalist countries, or routed through international agencies, is often conditional on (a) purchase of goods and services from the ^donor5 country,



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