Social Scientist. v 6, no. 61 (Aug 1977) p. 84.


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84 SOCIAL SCIENTIST

England., America and Holland). Williams disapproves of the contention of the New Leftists like Marcuse that the working class in the west has lost its potentiality for transforming society. He praises Gramsci's concept of "cultural hegemony" and maintains that the cultural dominance of the capitalist class must be fought and the traits of bourgeois value-orientation ingrained in the personality of the people must be eradicated. Finally Juliet Mitchel (^Women's Liberation, Marxism and Socialist Family"), making a powerful and reasonable appeal for correlating the workers' class struggle with women's struggle against their exploitation, explodes the Bohemianism of the western ^women's lib."

On the whole, the book has a stimulating impact on the reader in the sense that on the one hand, it opens new vistas of Marxian studies and on the other, provides a clue to the understanding of what false notions about Marxism may crop up in the minds of socialists-Further, it provokes those who are genuinely interested in writing books on Marxism to attempt a comprehensive account of the multi-dimensionality of Marxism incorporating within its orbit a detailed examination of the New Left, Democratic Socialism, Socialist Humanism, Existential Marxism, and Christian Marxism with a view to exposing the fallacies inherent in the ideas of the self-styled Marxists.

VIRENDRA K ROY

M N SRINIVAS, S SESHAIH, ANDV S PARTHASARATHY(EDS. ^DIMENSIONS OF SOCIAL CHANGE IN INDIA, Allied Publishers Private Limited, 1977.

THE OUTCOME of a national seminar on social change held in Banga-lore in 1972, this volume includes papers on a number of aspects of Indian society varying from the role of religion to that of family. Despite this, as mentioned by the editors themselves, many of the dimensions of social change,including the politico-economic,have been insufficiently covered. However, some of the papers provide good raw material essential for a new approach to the study of social change. One such is that by Bandho-padhyay who attacks Indian sociologists for their preoccupation with caste as a frame of analysis, disregarding an approach based on class. Though caste still remains an important institution in rural India, there has been considerable loosening of the rigidities of the old hierarchical order. This is especially true since the advent of the e 'Green Revolution55 which is reorganizing rural society more along class lines. Such a point of view is substantiated by AggarwaPs paper which deals with the social implications of the Green Revolution in Punjab. Unfortunately, Bandho-padhyay's criticism holds true for a large number of the papers included in the volume. Further, since the papers have been contributed by writers with widely differing views, the book lacks focus and hardly makes interesting reading.

RS



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