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Imperial Gazetteer of India, v. 8, p. 113.


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BHR DISTRICT I T3
changed the name of Champavatinagar to Bhir. After the death of
Muhammad bin Tughlak, the town fell successively to the Bahmani,
the Nizam Shahi, and the Adil Shahi kingdoms. The Mughals
eventually captured Bhir in 1635, and annexed the country to Delhi,
but it was again separated on the foundation of the Hyderabad State
early in the eighteenth century.
The chief places of archaeological interest are the forts and buildings
at Bhir. At Dhariar there is a fort built by the Ahmadnagar kings,
and a mosque built in the Hindu style of architecture by one of
Muhammad bin Tughlak's generals. Amba contains a temple
dedicated to Jogai. The temple of Baijnath at Parli is a celebrated
place of Hindu pilgrimage.
The number o towns and villages, including jigirs, is 1,004. The
population at each Census was: (1881) 558,345, (1891) 642,722, and
(1901) 492,258, the decrease during the last decade
being due to the famine of I9oo. The towns are Population.
BHIR, AMBA, FARM, and MAZALGAON. More than 9o. per cent. of
the population are Hindus, and 87 per cent. speak Marathi. The
following table shows the chief statistics of population in 1901
,'. Number of F... b~4C ~~ ~ 1y
_ O
B _ ay a
~ E H > a d V ~~ e r E 0 a e
y .>.3~a z.
Bhir 801 1 155 71,608 89 - 27-3
Gevrai 456 .. 119 50,672 111 - 28.1 9i
1 75
Mzalgaon 622 172 96,929 156 - 7.9
Amba 667 2 114 72,017 108 - ~,
25.0
Kaij. 445 .. 104 46e56o 104 -
34-4
Ashti 594 .. 122 51,999 88 - 22.7
Ptoda 341 .. 71 29,116 85 - 28-7 Z
jgirs, &c. 534 .. 143 73,357 1.37 -
24*9
Total 4,46o 4 1,000 492,258 110 - 23-4 14,852
In 1905 the Kaij tluh was amalgamated with Amba, the latter name
being retained.
The most numerous caste is the Maratha Kunbi, numbering
196,ooo, or more than 39 per cent. of the total population. Other
important agricultural castes are the Banjaras (36,4oo) and Kolis
(2,6oo). Next in point of numbers are the Mahars or village menials
(41,300), the Dhangars or shepherds (26,ooo), the Mangs and Chamars
or leather-workers (25,400), the Brahmans (2r,6oo), and the Malis or
gardeners (12,700). Of the trading castes, Vanis number 6,960 and
Marwaris 6,ioo. The population supported by agriculture is 265,200,
VOL. VIII. I
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