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Imperial Gazetteer of India, v. 11, p. 387.


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EASTERN BENGAL AND ASSAM 387
of the eleventh century. Some curious tombs built of tiles have
been referred to an invasion of the hills by the Mughals under Timur.
Two dispensaries are maintained here, one being supported by the
American Mission. The village is becoming an important trade centre
for the west of the District.
Dwara Nongtyrmen.--Petty State in the Khasi Hills, Assam.
The population in igor was 362, and the gross revenue in 1903-4
Rs. loo. The principal products are rice, millet, and oranges. The
most valuable mineral deposit is lime.
Dwarka.-Town and port in the Okhamandal tdluha, Amreli prdrat,
Baroda State, situated in 22° 22′ N. and 69° 5′ E., 235 miles south-
west of Ahmadabad, and 270 west of Baroda city. Population (rgol),
7,535. Dwarka is considered one of the most holy places in India,
and is greatly resorted to by Hindu pilgrims. In particular the temple
of Dwarkanath (`Lord of Dwarka,' a title of Krishna), which is built on
the north bank of the Gomti creek, is said to be visited by at least
to,ooo devotees annually, and most pious Hindus believe that it was
raised in one night by supernatural agency. It is built of sandstone,
plastered with chunam, and the main structure is five storeys in height,
the highest being loo feet from the ground. The whole is surmounted
by a conical spire rising to the height of 150 feet. The interior consists
of a shrine, and a hall with 6o pillars. At Dwarka is one of the four
maths founded by Sri Sankaracharya, the others being at SRINGERI in
Mysore in the south, JAGANN2iTH in Orissa in the east, and BADx11vaTx
on the Himalayas in the north.
The port of Dwarka, known as Rupan, is about a mile to the north
of the town; but the anchorage is insecure, and most steamers have to
lie two miles or more off shore. The lighthouse has recently been
entirely renovated. The chief exports are bajra, tal, ghi, and small
quantities of salt, while the chief imports are rice, wheat, jowdr, sugar,
piece-goods, &c. External trade is principally with Bombay, Surat,
Karachi, and Zanzibar. Dwarka possesses a hospital, a magistrate's
court, Anglo-vernacular and vernacular schools, and public offices.
It is also the head-quarters of the Okhamandal battalion of Baroda
troops, whose principal duty is to keep in order the Waghers. Since
the rebellion of these tribes in 1859, when the town was stormed by a
British force, an officer of the Bombay Political department has been
stationed here under the orders of the Resident at Baroda. The muni-
cipality receives a grant from the State of Rs. 1,goo.
Eastern Bengal and Assam.-In lgor the Province of Bengal
covered an area of nearly 19o,ooo square miles, and contained a popu-
lation of 781- million persons. The attention of the Government of
India had for some time been drawn to the constantly accumulating
evidence of the excessive and intolerable burden imposed upon the
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