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Imperial Gazetteer of India, v. 15, p. 1.


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IMPERIAL GAZETTEER
OF INDIA
VOLUME XV
Karachi District.-District in Sind, Bombay, lying between 23° 35′
and 26° 22′ N. and 66° 42′ and 68° 48′ E., with an area 6f 11,670
square miles. It is bounded on the north by LÔrkana ; on the east
by the Indus and HyderÓ'$ad District; on the south by the sea and
the Kori river; and on the west by the sea and the State of Las
Bela (BaluchistÓn), the river Hab forming for a considerable distance
the line of demarcation. The District, which covers a 'large tract of
land stretching from the mouth of the Indus to the
Baluchi boundary, differs considerably in appearance ' aspects.
from the general level of Sind by its possession of , asyec
a hilly western region, lying in the mahdl of Kohistan and the 0luha
of Karachi. Numerous lateral ranges of considerable height here push
forward into the plain from the KIRTHAR mountains, and diversify
the usually monotonous aspect of the and surface-by their spurs and
offshoots. From this lofty and barren tract, intersected by,deep and
wide valleys, the general aspect of the country, as intersected runs south-east-
ward in a vast sloping plain, becomes more and more level, until in
the extreme south the Indus delta-presents a broad expanse of. low,
flat alluvium, stretching away to the hori2on in one unbroken sheet,
varied only by the numerous creeks communicating with the ocean.
Large forests of babal and other trees fringe the river banks, and impart
a somewhat fresher appearance to the otherwise dreary landscape.
Elsewhere, however, the features of the Sind delta stand unrelieved
in their naked monotony. .
Apart from the INDUS and the Has rivers, there are only a few
minor torrents in the District. These take their rise in the western
hills, but consist of dry watercourses for the greater portion of the year,
filled only on the rare occasions when heavy rains fall on the higher
ranges in which they have their sources. The Hajamro and Baghar
are offshoots of the Indus, the former now constituting, the chLÚf
channel to the sea. At PIR MANGHO there are hot springs, situated
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