Previous Page [Digital South Asia Library] Next Page

Imperial Gazetteer of India, v. 17, p. 200.


Graphics file for this page
200 H,4NNj-RGUDI TOWN
Chola names and inscriptions of Chola, Pandya, and Hoysala kings.
Mannargudi itself was formerly called Rajadhiraja Chaturvedimangalam,
obviously a name of Chola origin. An old Jain temple stands in the
town, and a mile to the west is a ruined fort said to have been built by
a Hoysala king.
Manne.-Village in the Nelamangala tdluk of Bangalore District,
Mysore, situated in 13° 15' N. and 77° 18' E. Population (rgoi),
748. Under the name of Manyapura it was the residence of the
Ganga kings in the eighth century. It was taken by the Cholas at
the beginning of the eleventh century. The city is said to have
extended over 8 miles to the east, but only some ruins of temples now
remain.
Manohar (1Ulanoliargarli). - Fort in the State of Savantvadi,
Bombay, situated in 16° N. and 74° l' E., 14 miles north-east of Vādi,
and on the south of the Rangna pass. Manohar is a solid mass of
rock about 2,500 feet high, said to have been fortified since the time
of the Pandavas. In the disturbances of 1844 the garrison of Manohar
espoused the cause of the Kolhapur insurgents. In the beginning of
1845 the fort was taken by General Delamotte.
Manoharpur-Chief town of an estate of the same name in the
Sawai Jaipur nizdmat of the State of Jaipur, Rajputana, situated in
27° 18' N. and 75° 57' E., about 28 miles north-by-north-east of
Jaipur city. The holder of the estate is termed Rao, and serves the
Darbār with 65 horsemen. The population in igoi was 5,032. The
town contains a fort, and a primary school attended by 6o boys.
Manoli.-Town in the Parasgad tdluka of Belgaum District, Bom-
bay, situated in 15° 51' N. and 75° 7' E., 42 miles east of Belgaum town.
Population (1901), 5,308. Manoli had a once considerable, but now
declining, industry in dyeing yarns. It is famous as the spot where
General Wellesley, afterwards the Duke of Wellington, overtook the
notorious freebooter Dhind-deva Wagh (better known as Dhundia),
after a long pursuit from Mysore territory. The freebooter with his
followers had encamped on the banks of the river Malprabha, opposite
the town, where he was surprised by General Wellesley at the head
of a body of cavalry. The town contains eight temples dedicated to
Panchalinga Deo, built of coarse-grained stone, without any remarkable
carving; and a ruined fort. There is a boys' school with 97 pupils.
Manora.-Cape in Karachi District, Sind, Bombay, situated in
24° 48' N. and 66° 59' E. A lighthouse on the cape, with a fixed
light 148 feet above high water, is visible upwards of 20 miles, but only
from 10 to 15 miles during the south-west monsoon. Manora forms
a cantonment, and contains the Persian Gulf Telegraph department
cable factory and a recently constructed dry dock, known as the Giles
Graving Dock. The Karachi Port and Pilot establishments, the
Previous Page To Table of Contents Next Page

Back to Imperial Gazetteer of India | Back to the DSAL Page

This page was last generated on Monday 18 February 2013 at 16:20 by dsal@uchicago.edu
The URL of this page is: http://dsal.uchicago.edu/reference/gazetteer/text.html